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Tell George Mason University: Don't hire accused sexual predator Brett Kavanaugh

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Petition to George Mason University President Angel Cabrera:

"Listen to your students and trust survivors. Cancel accused sexual assaulter Brett Kavanaugh's teaching contract."

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    Tell George Mason University: Don't hire accused sexual predator Brett Kavanaugh

    Multiple women have credibly accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault. But despite those allegations and Kavanaugh's vile performance at his Supreme Court confirmation hearings, George Mason University officials still think he has the credibility to teach.1

    Led by sexual assault survivors, GMU students are protesting the university's decision to hire Brett Kavanaugh for a part-time law school teaching position. A petition against the hire garnered more than 10,000 signatures and hundreds of students appeared at a public forum to protest the decision.2

    If GMU leadership moves forward with giving Kavanaugh a job, they are making it clear that the university is not a safe space for survivors. The university will also send a nationwide signal that there are few repercussions for men who face sexual assault allegations. We cannot let that happen.

    Tell George Mason University: Don't hire accused sexual predator Brett Kavanaugh.

    In a painful and awkward moment at a student forum, only one of the many school administrators present said that she would feel comfortable having someone facing sexual assault allegations around her children. Yet GMU President Angel Cabrera made it clear the school still plans to move forward with its decision to hire Kavanaugh despite the overwhelming protest from students.3

    Dr. Christine Blasey Ford's brave and credible testimony and Kavanaugh's unhinged denials should be enough to convince GMU not to hire him. But on top of being credibly accused of sexual assault, Kavanaugh also lied repeatedly about the allegations:4

    • Kavanaugh said he first heard about Deborah Ramirez' allegations when "The New Yorker" published them on Sept. 23. But text messages show that Kavanaugh and his team were trying to refute Ramirez’s allegations before they became public.5
    • Kavanaugh claimed to have “no connections” to Yale, explaining “I got there by busting my tail.” But Kavanaugh’s grandfather attended the school, giving him an advantage as a legacy student under Yale's admissions policies.6
    • Kavanaugh said that he and Dr. Ford did not travel in the same social circles. But Dr. Ford dated Kavanaugh's friend Chris Garrett (aka Squi), whom Kavanaugh mentioned repeatedly in his testimony, in the summer of 1982.7
    • Kavanaugh said that none of the gatherings on his calendar included the group of people that Dr. Ford identified. But a July 1 calendar entry included the same people that Dr. Ford said attended the gathering.8
    • Kavanaugh claimed that "all the witnesses who were there say it didn’t happen." But Dr. Ford's friend Leland Keyser, one of those Dr. Ford says was present, said she believes Dr. Ford's allegation.9

    These lies matter. Each one undermines Kavanaugh's denials of the multiple sexual assault claims against him. Lying under oath is perjury – an offense that warrants impeachment and removal from the Supreme Court, not to mention leaving him incapable of credibly teaching at a school of law. We need to show GMU that countless Americans stand with GMU student survivors and oppose the university's hurtful decision to reward Kavanaugh with a cushy teaching position.

    Tell George Mason University: Don't hire accused sexual predator Brett Kavanaugh.

    Thank you for speaking out.

    References:

    1. Jennifer Bendery, "George Mason University Doesn’t Care That Its Students Oppose Brett Kavanaugh’s Hire," HuffPost, April 18, 2019.
    2. Ibid.
    3. Ibid.
    4. Demand Justice, "Kavanaugh: 31 Lies and Counting," Medium, Oct. 1, 2018.
    5. Heidi Przybyla and Leigh Ann Caldwell, "Text messages suggest Kavanaugh wanted to refute accuser's claim before it became public," NBC News, Oct. 2, 2018.
    6. Jason Lemon, "Kavanaugh said he had 'no connections' to Yale. He was, in fact, a legacy student," Newsweek, Sept. 30, 2018.
    7. Michael Kranish, Joe Heim and Emma Brown, "Details in Kavanaugh’s 1982 calendar entry could be scrutinized in FBI investigation," Washington Post, Sept. 28, 2018.
    8. Li Zhou, "Brett Kavanaugh’s July 1 calendar entry that could help Ford’s case, explained," Vox, Sept. 28, 2018.
    9. Ariane de Vogue, "Christine Blasey Ford's friend is not refuting Ford's allegation, will cooperate with FBI, lawyer says," CNN, Sept. 29, 2018.

    Photo: Tom Williams/ Getty Images